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10.20.14 Auto News
"Pulling the plug: EV battery module exchange put to test"
A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, plans to make a cross-country trip in an electric vehicle -- without plugging the car in once. Instead of going by the traditional plug-and-wait protocol for EVs, the engineers will swap out rechargeable, briefcase-size battery modules on the fly as they travel from San Diego to the coast of South Carolina in less than 60 hours. The engineers plan to make the trek next year in a 2002 Volkswagen Golf they converted into an EV.

10.16.14 Live Science
"Is Car Hacking the Next Big Security Threat?"
It may seem convenient to have a hands-free phone built into your car, or to have a GPS system in your vehicle, but as automobiles incorporate more navigation and wireless communication technologies, could these super-connected cars become increasingly vulnerable to hackers?

10.13.14 the Robot Report
"UCSD investing in robotics"
At a one-day forum on the UCSD campus, Chancellor Pradeep Khosla did two unusual things: he spent most of the day at the Contextual Robotics Technologies Intl Forum, and he announced that UCSD would create five new faculty slots in robotics and plans to develop a world-class robotics cluster in the San Diego area.

10.13.14 San Diego Daily Transcript
"DARPA robotics focus needs switching from battlefield to supply"
Defense contractors take note: The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is predicting a budgeting switch from a focus on the "tooth," or battlefield robotics needs, to the "tail," further down the chain from the battlefield itself. "My prediction as to where defense budgeting in robotics is going to come in the future is we have to stop monopolizing the view, which is that it's all about the battlefield -- it's actually a lot about the tail, as well," Gill Pratt, program manager at DARPA.

10.12.14 The Guardian
"The Magic of Coding"
Whereas the United Kingdom has made computer programming classes in primary and elementary school mandatory, the United States still lags behind as many schools do not offer such classes. This is what inspired UCSD graduate students Stephen Foster, Lindsey Handley and Sarah Esper to create ThoughtSTEM, a start-up company that caters to teaching kids how to code. ThoughtSTEM has launched a Kickstarter campaign for their newest educational game, Codespells

10.10.14 U~T
"UCSD invests big in robotics"
The day may be coming when a swarm of tiny flying robots will appear at your door if you dial 911 for help. "Robots can be there in a matter of seconds and provide police with the information they need when they respond," said Vijay Kumar, a researcher who is developing such robots at the University of Pennsylvania. He tossed out this little mind grenade on Friday at UC San Diego, where some of the nation's top scientists met to discuss the potential of robotics.

10.8.14 U~T
"UCSD engineer making risky Amazon trek"
UC San Diego materials engineer Marc Meyers leaves Monday for Brazil, where he will lead an expedition that will retrace the path that Theodore Roosevelt took during his famous "River of Doubt" journey in 1913-14. Meyers will be accompanied by Jeffrey Lehmann of Del Mar, an Emmy Award-winning filmmaker whose work has been featured on the Discovery Channel and PBS.

10.7.14 U~T
"CodeSpells video game getting makeover"
The San Diego start-up ThoughtStem has raised $164,000 on Kickstarter to upgrade CodeSpells, a popular video game that teaches basic programming skills by having users craft magical spells to overcome problems. CodeSpells was released in April 2013 by Stephen Foster and Sarah Esper, who created the game while they were graduate students at UC San Diego. Schools across the country quickly began using the game to teach coding to children.

10.7.14 Autoblog Green
"Is the M-BEAM battery module swapping tech an EV game changer?"
Electric-vehicle battery swapping? A tough sell. Battery module swapping? That may change things. UC San Diego researchers are working on a project where battery modules can be detached and swapped, allowing for EVs to get a full charge without having to spend hours hooked up to charging stations. The project is called Modular Battery Exchange and Active Management (M-BEAM) and involves 20- to 30-pound battery modules getting swapped and charged.

10.6.14 Popular Mechanics
"These Rubbery Robots Use Explosions to Jump"
Scientists recently demonstrated that a soft robot could crawl like a starfish through fire, over snow, and even after being run over by a car, all without the constraints of a tether. To control the bot, scientists used air pumps that force bursts of air in and out of a series of pneumatic channels running through its limbs.

10.1.14 Xconomy
"Building a Robotics Ecosystem: Q&A with UC San Diego's Al Pisano"
It's been almost a year since UC San Diego and Qualcomm confirmed an initiative was underway to create an ambitious robotics institute that would include a new incubator for robotics startups. The effort was conceived as a way to put San Diego on the map as an up-and-coming innovation hub in robotics, create inroads for Qualcomm's wireless technologies, and enable UC San Diego to join the ranks of elite universities already leading the nation in robotics R&D.

10.1.14 Popular Mechanics
"The Company Trying to End DDoS Attacks Once and for All"
Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks are getting nastier. Thanks to the proliferation of faster, more powerful computers and the availability of cheap bandwidth, this popular form of cyberattack--which prevents users from accessing a targeted website by bombarding it with messages from a group of hijacked machines--are frequently reaching 100 gigabits per second. DDoS attacks are one of the most effective ways that attackers can crash a website they don't like.

9.23.14 KPBS
"Minecraft Can Help Kids Learn To Code. Will Microsoft Keep It That Way?"
Stanley Strum is spending his time in class today building a TARDIS, the time machine from the TV show "Doctor Who." "The machine pretends to be a telephone box, but actually it's an infinite, ginormous, thing on the inside," he explains. Strum, a fourth grader, is building this TARDIS out of blocky pixels -- kind of like digital Legos -- in the world of Minecraft. Last week, Minecraft's parent company was bought by Microsoft for $2.5 billion.

9.22.14 Charged Electric Vehicles Magazine
"A better way to battery-swap?"
The idea of battery swapping for EVs has been around for some time, but the reality has not been auspicious. Better Place bet on the concept and went bankrupt. Tesla successfully demonstrated a battery swap in 2013, but so far has not gotten around to opening any swap stations to the public. A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego is working on a different approach.

9.20.14 Coin Desk
"Cryptocurrency Miners Turn to Exotic Cooling Systems as Competition Heats Up"
Amid Singapore's humid equatorial heat, a group of researchers and faculty at the island's main technical education institute are sweating over an unconventional cooling solution -- for litecoin miners. The institute, known more for strait-laced vocational courses, has partnered with litecoin startup CloudMining.sg to develop a liquid immersion cooling system for the firm's miners, in conjunction with materials science giant 3M.

9.19.14 Engineering.com
"Engineers Develop a New Algorithm For EV Battery Recharges and Switches"
Imagine being able to switch out the batteries in electric cars just like you switch out batteries in a photo camera or flashlight. A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are trying to accomplish just that, in partnership with a local San Diego engineering company.Rather than swapping out the whole battery, which is cumbersome and requires large, heavy equipment, engineers plan to swap out and recharge smaller units within the battery, known as modules.

9.19.14 Space Daily
"Algorithm allows easy switch out and recharge of electric car batteries"
Imagine being able to switch out the batteries in electric cars just like you switch out batteries in a photo camera or flashlight. A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are trying to accomplish just that, in partnership with a local San Diego engineering company. Rather than swapping out the whole battery, which is cumbersome and requires large, heavy equipment, engineers plan to swap out and recharge smaller units within the battery, known as modules.

9.17.14 Product Design & Development
"Electric Cars Batteries That Easily Switch Out"
Imagine being able to switch out the batteries in electric cars just like you switch out batteries in a photo camera or flashlight. A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are trying to accomplish just that, in partnership with a local San Diego engineering company. Rather than swapping out the whole battery, which is cumbersome and requires large, heavy equipment, engineers plan to swap out and recharge smaller units within the battery, known as modules.

9.17.14 R & D Magazine
"New algorithms lets owners swap, recharge battery modules in electric cars"
Imagine being able to switch out the batteries in electric cars just like you switch out batteries in a photo camera or flashlight. A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are trying to accomplish just that, in partnership with a local San Diego engineering company. Rather than swapping out the whole battery, which is cumbersome and requires large, heavy equipment, engineers plan to swap out and recharge smaller units within the battery, known as modules.

9.17.14 nanowerk
"Engineers develop algorithms that allow you to switch out and recharge battery modules in electric cars"
Imagine being able to switch out the batteries in electric cars just like you switch out batteries in a photo camera or flashlight. A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are trying to accomplish just that, in partnership with a local San Diego engineering company. Rather than swapping out the whole battery, which is cumbersome and requires large, heavy equipment, engineers plan to swap out and recharge smaller units within the battery, known as modules.

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