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3.27.15 USA Today
"See our 6 picks of the coolest things from the Toy Fair"
Video: See our 6 picks of the coolest things from the Toy Fair: Features MiPosaur

3.19.15 CNET
"Mind-reading toy trains 'Star Wars' Jedi Masters -- with holograms"
At this year's New York Toy Fair, I got a taste of how tech is transforming playtime. But you'll need a tablet or smartphone to get the most out of these new toys:

2.27.15 San Diego Daily Transcript
"UCSD engineering school launches 'agile research centers'"
Albert Pisano, dean of the University of California, San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, has held this role for less than 1½ years, but has already unveiled plans for what he calls 'agile research centers' within the school. The projects are the Center for Wearable Sensors, which is up and running; a Center of Extreme Events Research is in the works, and a Sustainable Power and Energy Center and Center for Visual Computing are in the early planning stages.

2.25.15 ABC News
"How a Researcher Is Trying to Turn Tattoos Into Medical Devices"
A California researcher is trying to turn "tattoos" into tiny "medical labs" -- with early prototypes able to monitor a person's workout or measure a diabetic's blood-glucose levels. A team led by Dr. Joseph Wang, chairman of nanoengineering at the University of California San Diego, first developed the fitness-tracker temporary tattoo designed to measure a key chemical on the skin that can give insight into a person's workout.

2.24.15 Scientific American
"6 of the Coolest Science Toys Coming Out in 2015"
MiPosaur listed as one of the 6 coolest science toys coming out in 2015. The American International Toy Fair is the stuff of dreams?both childhood and adult. All the newest toys, including magnetic sand, remote-controlled pterodactyls, stuffed-animal Grumpy Cats and endless construction sets, are not only on display throughout three massive floors?they?re unboxed.

2.19.15 YAHOO! Tech
"WATCH: The 7 Coolest Toys of Toy Fair 2015"
MiPosaur one of the 7 coolest toys at toy fair 2015

2.16.15 Fox Business
"Biggest toy trends come to NYC for 2015 Toy Fair"
Video: FBN's Adam Shapiro talks to Toy Industry Association's Adrienne Appell about the latest toy products and trends.

2.11.15 Huffington Post
"Interactive Toys for Kids"
Technology has made its way into the playroom for years -- but scratchy sounding voice boxes and mechanics that spark noisy, grinding movements are simply not enough anymore. "Watch me" toys, which essentially just perform for kids with the push of a button, like 1996's Tickle Me Elmo, are no longer impressive to kids or their parents. But what if your toy actually understood you? What if it had more than 150 unique sounds, phrases, responses and movements? What if...

2.10.15 Xconomy
"San Diego's 10 Top-Funded Kickstarter Tech Projects of 2014"
Securing venture funding for tech startups has never been easy in San Diego, especially after the great recession came to town in 2008. But in recent years, crowdfunding has opened a new outlet for technology innovation in San Diego and other regional hubs. (Our list of San Diego's 10 top-funded tech projects on Kickstarter is below.)

2.10.15 Citizen's News
"Engineers work to unlock syndrome"
Engineers work to unlock syndrome

2.10.15 NBC New York
"I-Team: Hackers Can Take Control of Cars From 3,000 Miles Away"
With thousands of new cars and trucks equipped with factory-installed Wi-Fi, hackers have lots of new targets on the road. An I-Team investigation found it is already possible to use Wi-Fi to control key electronics of vehicles from long distances. Using a Wi-Fi dongle, a small electronic gadget easily purchased online for about $10, auto hacker Craig Smith allowed the I-Team to control the headlights and windshield wipers of a Mazda parked in Seattle from a laptop computer in New York City.

2.9.15 Medium.com
"How a Lone Hacker Shredded the Myth of Crowdsourcing"
High-tech analysis of a 2011 DARPA Challenge shows why we can't have nice things

2.5.15 New Scientist
"Doc-watcher spots when physicians stop listening"
THE doctor is in ? but are they listening to you, or is that iPad on the desk absorbing all their attention? Electronic records, medical apps, iPads, and other devices and technologies offer numerous potential benefits for healthcare workers and have been widely adopted. But they also create more opportunities for distraction and might erode the quality of care someone receives. The Lab-in-a-Box aims to change that by analysing doctors as they work.

2.3.15 Yahoo News!
"All About the Bass: How Baleen Whales Hear Very Low Frequencies"
Baleen whales, the largest creatures on Earth, can send extremely low-frequency underwater calls to one another. But little is known about how they actually process these sounds. Now, researchers have found that the whales have specialized skulls that can capture the energy of low frequencies and direct it toward their ear bones to hear. Baleen whales, which use baleen plates in their mouths to filter out tiny organisms and other food from the ocean, have two ways of hearing sound

2.2.15 KUSI News
"UCSD scientists awarded $2.7M grants for stem cell research"
Two scientists with UC San Diego were awarded a combined $2.7 million in grants from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to pursue their studies on stem cell therapies, the school announced Monday. Shyni Varghese, an associate professor in the Department of Bioengineering and director of the Bio-Inspired Materials and Stem Cell Engineering Laboratory, received a $1.4 CIRM grant to improve the function of transplanted stem cells.

2.1.15 io9
"A Baleen Whale Skull Conducts Sound 'Like An Acoustic Antenna'"
Researchers used computer models and high-powered simulations to confirm that whales' skulls have evolved to act "like an acoustic antenna," amplifying and transmitting low-frequency sounds (hypothesized to be important in long-range communication) toward the ears.

1.30.15 the Christian Science MONITOR
"Baleen whales hear with their bones, study finds"
A biologist and an engineer have published a study in the journal PLOS ONE that suggests the skulls of baleen whales have evolved the ability to feel sound in their bones. Baleen whales are a filter-feeding suborder of cetacea that includes fin whales and blue whales -- the two largest living animal species in the world. The blue whale can grow to be almost 100 feet long and weigh over 400,000 pounds, making it the heaviest known animal to have ever lived.

1.30.15 Smithsonian
"Scientists Finally Know How Baleen Whales Hear"
Scientists have been working hard to protect whales from underwater sounds, which they suspect can disrupt whale communication. But even as they've pushed for legislation to limit low-frequency sounds in oceans and bays, there's always been a missing link. That's because they have never really understood how whales hear at all -- until now. Marine biologist Ted W. Cranford wasn't satisfied with past research, which relied on a set of inferences about the frequencies at which whales communica

1.29.15 Live Science
"All About the Bass: How Baleen Whales Hear Very Low Frequencies"
Baleen whales, the largest creatures on Earth, can send extremely low-frequency underwater calls to one another. But little is known about how they actually process these sounds. Now, researchers have found that the whales have specialized skulls that can capture the energy of low frequencies and direct it toward their ear bones to hear. Baleen whales, which use baleen plates in their mouths to filter out tiny organisms and other food from the ocean, have two ways of hearing sound

1.29.15 Discovery News
"Mystery of Baleen Whale's Hearing May Be Solved"
In what a researcher calls a "grand discovery," the question of how baleen whales hear may have been answered, solving a long-standing mystery. Baleen whales, the largest animals on Earth at about 65 to 80 feet long, can emit vocalizations at very low frequencies, at wavelengths sometimes longer than the whales themselves. But how they hear, has remained to scientists a bit of a puzzle. Rather than use more traditional whale-hearing analysis

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