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7.30.15 Wired
"Facebook Is About to Test Its Enormous Solar-Powered Drone"
At An Airfield somewhere in the UK, there's a drone with the wingspan of a Boeing 737. And it belongs to Facebook. This enormous unmanned aerial vehicle is called Aquila--a nod to the eagle who carried Zeus's thunder bolts in Greek mythology--and it's part of Facebook's rather ambitious effort to deliver Internet access to the more than 4 billion people on earth who don't already have it. The idea is that Aquila will circle in the stratosphere, above the weather, wirelessly beaming Internet

7.30.15 San Diego Daily Transcript
"Cybertheft is more than stolen identity"
"Our research team at UCSD needs a large number of bogus credit cards in order to buy illegal products from international criminals," was the message that Stefan Savage, Ph.D. shared with a group of Chancellor's Associates at the Faculty Club in June. That may seem like a strange study program for a group of undergraduates. Actually, Savage was discussing what cybercrime hackers do with all the personal identity they have extracted from major retail chain stores and various government agencies.

7.30.15 PSFK
"An Improved Invisibility Cloak Could See Itself Implemented in Interior Design"
University of California, San Diego designs a thin invisibility cloak to hide objects on flat surfaces

7.30.15 Clapway
"A Boxfish is Bio-Inspiring New Materials for Robots and Flexible Electronics"
The boxfish has unique armor that could serve as inspiration for body armor, robots and even flexible electronics, a new research has found. Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, unveiled that a boxfish's hard frame and flexible body make it an ideal animal to study for inspiration for armor materials. "The boxfish has been able to thrive in nature for over 35 million years with effectively the same armor," Steven Naleway a materials science and engineering Ph.D. student

7.30.15 Forbes.com
"Researchers Say These Fish Scales Could Be Prototype For Flexible New Body Armor"
The hard frame and flexible body of the boxfish could serve as a biological blueprint for body armor, robots and flexible electronics in the future according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego.

7.29.15 Gizmag
"Researchers look to the boxfish for new body armor materials"
Researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) are taking inspiration from nature in the search for new materials that could one day be used to create more effective body armor. The study, which was supported by the US Air Force, focuses on the unique structure and strength of the hexagonally-scaled shell of the boxfish. The idea of looking to nature for inspiration when it comes to next-gen armor isn't anything new.

7.28.15 Foreign Policy
"Innovations: The Little Engine That Can"
Toyota, Honda, General Motors, and at least a dozen other automakers are jostling to dominate the nascent market for zero-emission, hydrogen-powered vehicles. But the newest commercial hydrogen car, the Toyota Mirai, still comes in at a whopping $57,500--blame the steep expense of onboard hydrogen storage--so it's no surprise that only a few are on the market today. Hydrogen fuel cells typically generate electricity by fusing stored hydrogen gas with oxygen.

7.27.15 Drupa newsroom
"Printed electronics keep shirts cool - literally"
Cranking up the heat or the air conditioner have been common responses to changes in temperature for decades. But what if the microclimate could be controlled at the individual level? What if clothing had the capacity to become automatically thinner or thicker if the surroundings heated up or cooled down? Researchers at UC San Diego are exploring how printed electronics could help achieve this. Their efforts are supported with a 2.6 million USD grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (ARPA-E).

7.24.15 Press Examiner
"Soon Cataracts May Be Treated Through Eye Drops, Operation-Free"
Opthalmologist Kang Zhang at the University of California, San Diego, and his colleagues have shown that the biochemical called lanosterol can reduce the severity of natural cataracts in dogs.

7.23.15 Chicago Tribune
"Hackers manipulate Internet-connected Jeep during driving experiment"
A couple of cybersecurity advocates set out recently to prove how dangerous an Internet-connected car can be. As an experiment, Andy Greenberg, a senior writer for Wired Magazine, agreed to drive a Jeep Cherokee on a St. Louis highway while so-called "altruistic hackers" toyed -- sometimes dangerously -- with the car. The hackers, Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek, showed how Greenberg lost control of the vehicle as the accelerator stopped working, the radio blasted hip-hop at full volume

7.23.15 dvids
"Time is NOT on your side when exposed to chemical threats: New pharmaceuticals hope to change that paradigm"
One of the greatest dangers a warfighter can face is the sudden use of chemical weapons. It takes time to don protective equipment and even longer to test and determine the foe you're facing. Warfighters exposed to chemical weapons may get some of that time back due to access to medical pharmaceuticals that improve stability and efficacy in treating a broad-spectrum of chemical agents. In particular, results reported by principal investigator Dr. Liangfang Zhang and his team from the UCSD

7.23.15 NYC Today
"Cataract may one day be prevented or treated by using eye drops"
An unexpected discovery made during a genetic study can help treat or prevent cataract with just eye drops. In the study, the researchers found a molecule that leads to be formation of cholesterol in human cells. Study's lead researcher Dr. Kang Zhang from UC San Diego and team have unveiled that the substance is known as lanosterol. It has the ability to accumulate proteins in the lens of the eye that causes cataracts.

7.23.15 KPBS
"Could these new eye drops cure cataracts?"
If you live long enough, chances are you'll get cataracts. Cataracts, a condition in which the lens of the eye becomes cloudy, are linked to nearly half of the world's cases of blindness, primarily in low-income countries that lack access to surgery. Cataracts also cause vision problems for 94 million people worldwide. A study released this week shows that a natural chemical, produced in our bodies, can uncloud cataracts. The findings were made in rabbits and dogs

7.22.15 CS Monitor
"Can automakers build hacker-proof cars? (+video)"
What's worse than a backseat driver? A remote one, who takes the wheel by hacking into your car's computer. Wired's Andy Greenberg described how cybersecurity researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek hacked his Jeep Cherokee from 10 miles away, causing it to slow to a crawl in the middle of a busy highway. Previously, Mr. Miller and Mr. Valasek had successfully hacked cars from the backseat with their laptops plugged into the diagnostic port

7.22.15 Forbes.com
"This Jumping 3D Printed Robot Uses Butane And Oxygen For Power"
Researchers at Harvard University and University of California, San Diego have made the first 3D printed robot with both hard and soft body parts that can make more than 100 jumps on its own. To top it all off, the robot is powered by a mixture of butane and oxygen. The blueprint for creating this hybrid hard and soft robot came from directly from nature via a species of mussels which have a foot that becomes rigid when it comes into contact with rocks.

7.22.15 WebMD
"Drops Show Promise as Nonsurgical Cataract Treatment"
Eyes clouded by cataracts may one day be treated with drops rather than surgery, a new animal study suggests. Today, surgery is the only means of treating cataracts, the leading cause of blindness in the world. Doctors extract cloudy lenses and replace them with artificial lenses. But researchers have discovered that an organic compound called lanosterol can improve vision by dissolving the clumped proteins that form cataracts, said study lead author Dr. Kang Zhang

7.22.15 Gizmag
"Eye drops could spell the end of cataract surgery"
new research suggests a less invasive solution might be on the way in the form of a naturally-occurring molecule that can be administered through a simple eye drop. Scientists had suspected that a molecule called lanosterol may have a role to play in the onset of cataracts. Scientists had suspected that a molecule called lanosterol may have a role to play in the onset of cataracts.

7.22.15 NBC Right Now
"Success in dogs points to first nonsurgical cataract treatment"
Eyes clouded by cataracts may one day be treated with drops rather than surgery, a new animal study suggests. Doctors extract cloudy lenses and replace them with artificial lenses. But researchers have discovered that an organic compound called lanosterol can improve vision by dissolving the clumped proteins that form cataracts, said study lead author Dr. Kang Zhang, chief of ophthalmic genetics with the Shiley Eye Institute at the University of California, San Diego.

7.22.15 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Cataracts reversed in animal study, human therapy eyed"
Cataracts may eventually be treatable with eyedrops instead of surgery, according to an animal study led by UC San Diego scientists. Researchers led by Kang Zhang treated cataracts in dogs and dissected lenses from rabbits with lanosterol, a precursor of cholesterol. In both cases, lens transparency significantly improved, compared to controls. Lanosterol works by dissolving mutant proteins that cloud the lens, leaving behind the normal clear proteins, called crystallin.

7.22.15 Yahoo News!
"Eye drop gives hope for knifeless cataract cure"
An eye drop tested on dogs suggests that cataracts, the most common cause of blindness in humans, could one day be cured without surgery, a study said Wednesday. A naturally-occurring molecule called lanosterol, administered with an eye dropper, shrank canine cataracts, a team of scientists reported in Nature. Currently the only treatment available for the debilitating growths, which affect tens of millions of people worldwide, is going under the knife.

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